Psalm 98

Psalm 98

It occurred to me during the middle of one of our services a couple of weeks ago as Joe was making his guitar sing that a guitar solo might be considered offensive in church. The thought may have whizzed through my mind at other points during my life, but I never gave it much credence. I’m prone to taking almost any argument in an “ad absurdum” type of way (much to Jaime’s chagrin) and I long for consistency. So, it got me thinking. Is a guitar solo irreverent? If so, how so? We have instrumental breaks in music regularly. Is it because one instrument is standing out beyond the rest? Surely we have the makings for quite a terrible symphony if the first chair violin is never to be heard above the last chair oboe. No offense to any oboe players out there! I’m just wondering if there is something to the notion that a guitar solo could be irreverent. 

Seeing God in Relationships

Seeing God in Relationships

One of the reoccurring things I have students do when I meet with them is to pinpoint a couple of things that have influenced their spiritual growth up to that point in their lives.  It is an open-ended question that I don’t expect certain answers for but seem to always get a re-occurring theme over and over again. Rather than it being deep theological lessons from a sermon or lesson. More than it being an experience in a foreign country serving others. More than it being the tools and tasks given to them to do on their own. The thing that comes up over and over again are the relationships they have had with others.

Love and Vulnerability

Love and Vulnerability

We were created to know and be known, to love and be loved. We're all walking around with this deep seeded need to be fully known and through being fully known, to be fully loved. February has become a month focused on love. You walk into any store and are hit with red hearts and chocolates wrapped in shiny cellophane. There are rows and rows of Valentine's cards, stuffed animals, and candies stamped with words of sentiment. Combine that with the heart eye’s emoji and a meme of a cat holding a flower and you can seemingly express your love and affection to anyone in your life without really expressing anything at all – without knowing or being known.  Because to know and be known might mean being rejected, instead of loved.

Persecution and "Silence"

Persecution and "Silence"

So, last week in my inbox there were two “news alert” emails.

One claims that 2016 was the hottest year ever on earth (during record-keeping times). Alarming.

More alarming: The other email reports that in 2016 Christians were the most persecuted religious group in the world; 90,000 believers died, or one every 6 minutes.

Pine Cove No Agenda 2017

“I just don’t know what to do!”
“There are too many options to choose from and I don’t want to mess up.”
“So much stuff is going on right now that I need a break.”
“I need to get rejuvenated before heading into my last semester.”

I heard these, and more, phrases throughout the course of this past weekend at our High School retreat. You can call teenagers selfish, entitled, arrogant, brats, or whatever other stereotypical thing our culture calls them, but you cannot call them rested. Now, you might think you know or have the laziest teenager around, but one thing I always learn from a weekend with literally no agenda is that students carry more burdens than we assume.

From the burden of getting into a certain school to handling family issues that most couldn’t dream about, our students need the space and ability to slow down and relax sometimes. This past weekend we gave them that. It was a weekend where we laid our burdens at the foot of the cross knowing that God doesn’t scold us with our load, but offers to take it from us. We assume everyone is willing to dump their junk on to Jesus so we don’t talk about the permission that we need sometimes to let it all go and fall into the arms of our Savior.

What we find in those moments is vulnerability. Vulnerability with each other and with a God who takes us where we are and helps us take a step deeper into Him. Our prayer going into the weekend was that grace would be shown more than it ever has through our students.

I want you to know that from my perspective, rest was needed, and grace was received by a group of students needing the assurance that they are humans, just like the rest of us.

– Jonathan

A Psalm 34 Sunday

A Psalm 34 Sunday

Every Sunday is unique, but most follow the same general pattern. We sing a couple of songs, say hello, make a few announcements, sing some more songs, teach for a while, and end with a song or two as we reflect on the scriptures. I love our pattern of worship at CBC, but every once in a while we stray off of our routine and have the opportunity to be a bit more creative.